Yearly Reports

Report by the Director and Director of Studies on the JACT Greek Summer School, held at Bryanston School 28 July – 10 August 2019

Students:

The 52nd Greek Summer School had 289 students. They included people educated in Australia, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Dubai, France, India, Turkey, the USA and Venezuela. The majority were at school in the UK. 60 students attended or had attended maintained schools. There were 25 university students, including two from the Charles University in Prague, two from Istanbul and one each from Bologna, Delhi, Pisa and Tokyo.
Eight were teachers or trainee teachers, attending the summer school to enhance their ability to teach their own students.

Greek classes:

There were 70 Beginners in 10 groups, 50 Intermediates (i.e. pre-GCSE) in 7 groups, and 169 Advanced students (from immediately post-GCSE to university level) in 20 groups. No group had more than ten students, and the size of Beginners groups was once again kept small thanks to a special grant from the Cambridge Classics Faculty. The Beginners all used Reading Greek except the teacher group, which used Taylor’s Greek to GCSE since that is the textbook that the teachers are most likely to use in their schools; the Intermediates used either Reading Greek or the Taylor course, depending on the students’ level and previous experience. Favourite authors and texts read by Advanced groups included: of the many books of Homer that were read, Iliad 3 and Odyssey 9, 13 and 18; amongst prose authors, Plato, Lucian and Demosthenes; of the dramatists, Euripides was the most popular, especially his Bacchae, Hippolytus and Helen; Sophocles, Aeschylus and Aristophanes all featured too.

Tutors:

There were 38 tutors, including 14 from universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Cologne, Durham, Glasgow, Manchester, Reading, Swansea, and Warwick), and three teaching at the summer school for the first time. One tutorship was again generously supported by Trinity College, Cambridge. Heather Sanger in her tenth year as our matron was as always supportive and reassuring to students and tutors alike. Will Cross, Patrick Johnson and Matilda Schwefel were superbly efficient and energetic Director’s Assistants.

Beyond the classes:

Visiting lecturers were William Allen on the Homeric hero, Jenny Bryan on why philosophers should read Homer, David Raeburn on the tragic poet’s task, Laura Swift on the newest Sappho and Katherine Clarke on the lively landscape of Herodotus. The home team was represented by Henry Cullen on Greek inscriptions, Alastair Harden on Dionysus, John Taylor on Aristophanes’ Frogs and Julian Spencer on Euripides’ Bacchae. The early-afternoon seminar programme continues to expand in attendance and in the range of topics on offer: Linear B, scansion, accentuation, prose composition, verse composition, the verb ἵημι, papyrology, the ancient schoolroom, similes, Herodotus and Persia, Hero and Leander, the Greek novel, New Testament Greek and Modern Greek. Katharine Radice visited to talk about teaching Greek and David Raeburn to give his presentation on the sound of Greek, and there was an English reading of Bacchae.

There was as usual lively competition among 34 teams in the Greek and general knowledge quiz, masterminded and compered by Tom Ford and Emma Woolerton. Eleanor Dickey and Philomen Probert led a walk to the Iron Age and Roman site of Hod Hill. A fine and varied concert was arranged, rehearsed and conducted by Rosalind Aczel and Keith Maclennan. Aristophanes’ Frogs was stylishly produced by Rowena Hewes and Adrienne Gould, with a highly talented cast. The Greek play on the final evening (driven indoors by the weather) was Euripides’ Bacchae, produced in a stunningly powerful way by Stuart Macaulay and Alastair Harden. Clare Sharp and her large team of helpers headed by Anne Bowers, Cathy Hudspith and James Thorne produced superb costumes and ingenious props for both plays.

Students’ feedback:

204 students (71%) returned questionnaires; this response rate was a record by a considerable margin, and the switch from paper to an online form can take the credit. Almost all students felt that they had made as much or indeed more progress with their Greek than they had expected. It was a typically industrious cohort: the vast majority of students devoted at least three hours per day to independent study, with many spending four or five hours on their Greek outside of the tutor sessions. The overwhelming majority said that they had found the academic pace challenging but rewarding, the teaching clear and the atmosphere supportive. Almost all respondents had attended many of the lectures and seminars on offer, and many had also found time to participate in the musical, dramatic or sporting activities. As in previous years, there were many comments praising individual tutors and the course as a whole.

Our thanks:

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cambridge Classics Faculty, the Oxford Faculty Board of Classics, the Craven Committee (Oxford), the Jowett Copyright Trust, the Classical Association and JACT Greek Project, Trinity College Cambridge, the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, the Gilbert Murray/Cromer Trust, JACT Summer Schools Trust and Classics for All.

The Summer School is as always grateful to Bryanston School, whose staff do everything they can to be helpful, and of whose superb facilities we have free run. The Summer School also relies on the commitment and dedication of many individuals throughout the year. We owe a particularly large debt to Cathy Bothwell, the Course Secretary, who from autumn onwards arranges almost every aspect of the Summer School, from initial publicity through the applications process and living arrangements at Bryanston to the coaches that transport people away at the end.

John Taylor, Director
Henry Cullen, Director of Studies

Report by the Director and the Director of Studies on the 51st JACT Greek Summer School, held at Bryanston School 29 July – 11 August 2018

The second half-century begins! The 51st Greek Summer School was, with 304 students, noticeably smaller than the 50th, for reasons unknown. Seven of the 304 were in employment, six of them teachers whose attendance at the Summer School will enhance their ability to teach Greek to their own students. A further 25 were undergraduate or postgraduate university students (including two from the Charles University in Prague, one from Cornell, and two from Koç University in Istanbul). The remaining 272 were at school or had just left. Our students included young people educated in Australia, the Czech Republic, Italy, Romania, Switzerland, Turkey, and the USA, and 67 from maintained schools in the UK. A notable innovation this year was the Teachers’ Course, aimed especially at schoolteachers (of Classics or other subjects) wishing to begin learning or to enhance their knowledge of Greek for the benefit of their own school. This year was the first when there was a beginners’ group dedicated to such teachers; the group was small but enthusiastic, and it is our firm intention to expand our provision in this area as rapidly as we can.

There were 64 Beginners in 11 groups, 59 Intermediates (i.e., pre-GCSE) in 8 groups, and 182 Advanced students (from immediately post-GCSE to university level) in 24 groups. No group had more than ten students, and the Beginners groups were kept to a maximum size of eight thanks to a special grant from the Cambridge Classics Faculty. The Beginners used Reading Greek (though the teacher group used John Taylor’s Greek to GCSE); the Intermediates used either Reading Greek or the Taylor course depending on the students’ level and previous experience. Favourite authors and texts read by Advanced groups included: of the many books of Homer that were read, Iliad 3, 22 and 24, and Odyssey 9 and 13; of prose authors, Plato, Lysias, Thucydides and Plutarch; of the dramatists, Euripides was the most popular, especially his Hecuba and Bacchae; six groups this year read Aeschylus (a record for recent years), four Sophocles and two Aristophanes. Our stockpile of books continues to expand merrily.

There were 43 tutors, including 14 from universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Cologne, Durham, Glasgow, Manchester, Nicosia, Roehampton, and Warwick), one teaching at the Summer School for the first time. One tutorship was again generously supported by Trinity College, Cambridge. Heather Sanger in her ninth year as our matron was again supportive and reassuring to students and tutors alike. Lucy Emmanuel, Will Cross, and Matilda Schwefel were wonderfully reliable, energetic and efficient Director’s Assistants. Visiting lecturers were Peter Jones on the Iliad, Carol Atack on imaginary cities in Greek political thought, David Carter on Aristophanes and Birds, Robin Osborne on what Greek art can do that Greek texts cannot, and David Raeburn demonstrating the Sound of Greek in a sell-out afternoon seminar. The home team was represented by Costas Panayotakis on Greek mime, Kathryn Tempest on Greek oratory, John Penney on the Phrygians, David Langslow on Polybius, and Sarah Harden on Euripides’ Electra. The early-afternoon seminar programme again broke all previous records for the number and variety of topics on offer: scansion, 1000 years of Greek history, how to get people to agree, Linear B, accents, Stoicism, the Greeks and the East, verse composition, papyrology, Oscar Wilde’s Hellenism, the vase painter Exekias, New Testament Greek, Herodotus & Persia, a workshop in talking ancient Greek, and a rehearsed read-through of the Electra in English. There was as usual lively and entertaining competition between some forty strikingly named

teams in the Greek and general knowledge quiz, masterminded and brilliantly compered by Emma Woolerton and Tom Ford. There was a walk designed and led by James Thorne to the Iron Age site of Hod Hill. About 30 students took part in the lawn tennis tournament organized by John Dant. A moving and beautiful concert was held in the magnificent auditorium, including performances by three choirs and an orchestra, coordinated, rehearsed and conducted by Clive Letchford and Rosalind Aczel. Aristophanes’ Birds was as fresh, as funny, and as innovative as anyone could remember, stylishly directed by Ben Gravell and Edmund Lewis with a vastly talented cast and production team. The Greek play on the final evening (kept indoors by the rainclouds) was a grippingly watchable and beautifully spoken performance of Euripides’ Electra, lucidly and imaginatively produced by Tasos Aidonis with Anthony Bowen on chorus and diction, and Georgia Condell on choreography. Clare Sharp and her team of industrious helpers headed by Anne Bowers and Nick Denyer produced literally spectacular costumes and props for both plays.

156 students (51%) returned questionnaires, with almost all their feedback extremely positive. 69% felt that they had made more progress with their Greek than they had expected, and almost all the rest that they had achieved at least as much as they had hoped. It was a typically industrious cohort: 88% of respondents said they had devoted at least three hours per day to independent study, 64% over four hours, and 36% five hours or more. The overwhelming majority said that they had found the academic pace challenging but rewarding, the teaching clear and the atmosphere supportive. Almost all respondents had attended many of the lectures and seminars on offer, and many had also found time to participate in the musical, dramatic or sporting activities. As in previous years, there were many comments praising individual tutors and the course as a whole. We are once again very heartened by the students’ appreciation of the work of the Summer School.

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cambridge Classics Faculty, the Oxford Faculty Board of Classics, the Craven Committee (Oxford), the Jowett Copyright Trust, the Classical Association, Trinity College Cambridge, the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, the JACT Greek Project, the Gilbert Murray/Cromer Trust, and numerous donors to the Anniversary Bursary Campaign. Nearly a quarter
of students received financial support via the Summer School to enable them to attend, in addition to those who were funded directly by their schools, colleges or universities. The total amount awarded in bursary funds this year was 36% higher than our previous maximum.

The Summer School is, as always, grateful to Bryanston School, whose staff in all departments do everything they can to be helpful, and of whose world-class facilities we have virtually free run. The Summer School relies also on the commitment and dedication of many individuals throughout the year. Special thanks are due to our Treasurer, Julian Spencer, and to our new Outreach Officer, Emma Woolerton, for her energetic and exciting initiatives, and we owe a particularly large debt to Cathy Bothwell, the Course Secretary. From autumn to late summer, Cathy arranges practically every aspect of the Summer School, from initial publicity through the applications process and living arrangements at Bryanston to the coaches which transport people away at the end, and she is on hand throughout the fortnight to ensure that everything runs smoothly. Under Cathy’s leadership, the Summer School website and online facilities for applications and references are working remarkably well and going from strength to strength.

The premature death last August of James Morwood, the second founder and for many years Director of the Summer School, left a huge, unfillable hole in our midst. James was remembered publicly by Peter Jones before the first lecture and by John Taylor before the last, and on the middle Saturday in four moving couplets composed by Keith Maclennan. James was a constant presence and will always be among us at Bryanston.

David Langslow, Director Henry Cullen, Director of Studies

Students:

The 50th Greek Summer School had 337 students, which included people educated in Australia, Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Iceland, Italy, Ireland, the Netherlands, Singapore, Turkey and the USA, as well as in the UK; 92 had attended maintained schools in the UK.

Greek Classes:

There were 73 Beginners in 10 groups, 57 Intermediates (i.e. pre-GCSE) in 8 groups, and 207 Advanced students (from immediately post-GCSE up to university level) in 27 groups. No group had more than ten students; the Beginners groups were kept particularly small thanks to a special grant from the Cambridge Classics Faculty. The Beginners used the JACT Reading Greek textbooks, as did most of the Intermediates, though some of the latter used Taylor’s Greek to GCSE if that was what they had used previously. Extra grammar clinics were laid on for students who needed extra support or consolidation; these proved a useful forum both for exploring minutiae and for revising fundamentals. Favourite authors and texts read by Advanced groups included: among many different books of Homer, Iliad 3, 9 and 22, and Odyssey 5, 6 and 7; of prose authors, Plato, Lysias, and Demosthenes; for the drama text six groups read Sophocles’ Electra (to prepare them for the production of that play in Greek at the end of the course), with Euripides’ Electra proving almost as popular – this was the summer of the revenge tragedy.

Tutors:

There were 45 tutors, including seventeen from universities (Cambridge, Cologne, Durham, Glasgow, Kings College London, Liverpool, Manchester, Oxford, Reading and Roehampton) and ten teaching at the Summer School for the first time. One tutorship was again generously supported by Trinity College, Cambridge. Heather Sanger was our matron and the Director’s Assistants were Lucy Emanuel, Will Johnson and Abbas Khan.

Beyond the Classes:

Visiting lecturers were Adrian Kelly on the Homeric hero, Karen Ni-Mheallaigh on the moon in Greek literature and culture, Peter Thonemann on religion and politics in classical Athens and Paul Millett on literacy in Greece. There were also lectures by John Penney on Lycia, Kathryn Stevens on Babylonia, Angus Bowie on Aristophanes’ Acharnians, Costas Panayotakis on Greek literature in Petronius’ Satyricon and John Taylor on Sophocles’ Electra. There was in addition a daily programme of afternoon seminars covering a range of linguistic, literary, historical and philosophical topics.

Academic work was supplemented by a stimulating choice of extra-curricular activities. Eleanor Dickey and Philomen Probert dodged heavy rain to lead a walk to the Iron Age and Roman site at Hod Hill, and there was a coach excursion to Salisbury. Emma Woolerton devised and compèred a challenging quiz on the middle Saturday, and the concert featured performances by the course orchestra (conducted by Keith Maclennan) and choir (conducted by Rosalind Aczel) as well as a diverse selection of chamber and solo pieces. On the middle Sunday there was a sparkling and very funny performance, in English, of Aristophanes’ Acharnians, directed by a team led by James Thorne. Rain interfered with the final performance, in Greek, of Sophocles’ Electra and we could not use the Greek theatre; under the director Tom Ford’s expert guidance cast and crew responded magnificently in the Coade Hall with a driven and gripping interpretation. The costumes and props for both performances were provided by a large team of students and tutors under the guidance of Clare Sharp.

We celebrated the 50th iteration of the Summer School on the middle Saturday with a number of guests, including former Summer School Directors and Directors of Studies; after lunch, at which we enjoyed Keith Maclennan’s ode, written for the occasion, David Raeburn lectured on The Sound of Greek. Fundraising and outreach activities to mark the 50th anniversary are in development for 2018.

Student Feedback:

167 students (49%) returned questionnaires, with almost all their feedback extremely positive. The great majority felt that they had made more progress with their Greek than they had expected, and almost all the rest that they had achieved at least as much as they had hoped. It was, as usual, an impressively industrious Summer School: in addition to the contact time in lessons, students on average devoted four or five hours per day to independent study (this was spent doing language exercises, preparing texts, learning accidence, etc.); almost every respondent had spent at least three hours per day working independently. Time and again the students reported that they found the pace of the course challenging but rewarding, the teaching clear, and the environment supportive. Almost everyone had, in addition to their language work, attended many of the lectures and seminars on offer; plenty had also found the time to participate in musical, dramatic or sporting activities. The Summer School continues to attract students who like to be busy and are keen to make the most of the opportunities on offer. As in previous years, there was great praise both for individual tutors and for the course as a whole, and there were comments thanking all of our visiting and ‘home team’ lecturers.

Our Thanks:

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cambridge Classics Faculty, the Oxford Faculty Board of Classics, the Craven Committee (Oxford), the Jowett Copyright Trust, the Classical Association for a substantial contribution to the combined Summer Schools of JSST and for continuing the support separately offered to the Greek Summer School by the JACT Greek Project, Trinity College Cambridge, the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, the Gilbert Murray/Cromer Trust, private benefactors and the Classics Academy for granting us a share in the distribution of their funds. Their generosity ensures that the Summer School continues to be able to offer bursaries to all students who need financial assistance to attend the course.

The Summer School is, as always, very grateful to Bryanston School, whose facilities make possible a residential summer school and all the opportunities which arise from that. Its activities take place under the guidance of its Management Committee and depend very heavily on the support and advice of the committee’s members, particularly its Secretary, Helen van Noorden, the Sponsorship Secretary, Keith Maclennan, the Treasurer, Julian Spencer, and above all its Chair: we are very grateful to Elizabeth Warren, who demitted in August after three years in the role, for her tireless work on behalf of the Summer School and JSST, and to our incoming Chair, Chris Burnand. The Summer School simply could not take place without the work of the Course Secretary, Cathy Bothwell, who manages arrangements with Bryanston School, works throughout the year to publicise the Summer School, handles applications, organises travel and accommodation, and finally ensures that once we gather in Dorset the course runs like clockwork. We are all deeply in her debt.

Catherine Steel, Director
Henry Cullen, Director of Studies

Students:

The 49th Greek Summer School had 351 students, a modest increase on the last two years.
They included people educated in the USA, Ireland, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Poland, Germany, Italy, Spain, Dubai, Singapore, and Venezuela. The majority were at school in the UK. 67 students attended or had attended maintained schools, but we aim in future years to increase the proportion. There were 19 university students, including two from the Charles University in Prague and one from the Pontifical Xaverian University in Bogota.

Greek classes:

There were 75 Beginners in 12 groups, 63 Intermediates (i.e. pre-GCSE) in 8 groups, and 213 Advanced students (from immediately post-GCSE to university level) in 25 groups. No group had more than ten students; the Beginners groups were kept particularly small thanks to a special grant from the Cambridge Classics Faculty. The Beginners used the JACT Reading Greek textbooks, as did most of the Intermediates, though some of the latter used Taylor’s Greek to GCSE if that was what they had used previously. Favourite authors and texts read by Advanced groups included: among many different books of Homer, Iliad 3, 18 and 24, and Odyssey 6, 7 and 18; of prose authors, Plato, Demosthenes and Lysias; of the dramatists, Euripides was the most popular, in particular his Bacchae and above all his Women of Troy, ahead of the production of that play at the end of the fortnight.

Tutors:

There were 45 tutors, including 16 from universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Cologne, Durham, Glasgow, Liverpool, Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan, Reading, Swansea, and Warwick), and two teaching at the summer school for the first time. One tutorship was again generously supported by Trinity College, Cambridge. Two potential teachers were with us for the second week under the scheme efficiently administered by Simon Costello. Heather Sanger in her seventh year as our matron was again supportive and reassuring to students and tutors alike. Lucy Emmanuel, William Johnson and Thomas Kelly were superbly efficient and energetic Director’s Assistants.

Beyond the classes:

Visiting lecturers were Patrick Finglass on Stesichorus and Homer, Kathryn Tempest on Roman attitudes to the Greeks, Robin Osborne on making sense of Herodotus, Carrie Vout on seeing God in Greece and Rome, Judith Mossman on Plutarch and Shakespeare, and Emma Stafford on myth in Athenian vase-painting. The home team was represented by John Taylor on Aristophanes’ Wasps and Anthony Bowen on Euripides’ Women of Troy. The early-afternoon seminar programme continues to expand in attendance and in the range of topics on offer: Linear B, scansion, accentuation, the third declension, prose composition, verse composition, reading papyri, Greek mathematics, how to do ancient history, Zeno’s stadium paradox, the Romans and the Greek East, New Testament Greek, the Renaissance recovery of Greek, and Oscar Wilde’s Hellenism. There was as usual lively competition between some forty teams in the Greek and general knowledge quiz, masterminded and compered by Judith Affleck and Tom Ford. Eleanor Dickey and Philomen Probert led a walk to the Iron Age site of Hod Hill, Andrew Downey organized a lawn tennis tournament, and an excursion visited Salisbury. A fine and varied concert was arranged, rehearsed and conducted by Clive Letchford. Aristophanes’ Wasps was hilariously produced by Holly Eckhardt with a highly talented cast and production team. The Greek play in the open-air theatre on the final evening was Euripides’ Women of Troy, produced in a wonderfully atmospheric way by Emily Clifford with Anthony Bowen and Tom Ford. Clare Sharp and her large team of helpers headed by Anne Bowers and Nick Denyer produced superb costumes and ingenious props for both plays.

Students’ feedback:

165 students (45%) returned questionnaires, with almost all their feedback extremely positive. The great majority felt that they had made more progress with their Greek than they had expected, and almost all the rest that they had achieved at least as much as they had hoped. It was a typically industrious cohort: over 90% of respondents said they had devoted at least three hours per day to independent study (e.g. doing language exercises, preparing texts, learning accidence, etc.); about two thirds had done four or more hours’ private study per day. Students routinely said that they found the pace challenging but rewarding, the teaching clear, and the environment supportive. Almost everyone had, in addition to their language work, attended lots of the lectures and seminars; many had also found the time to participate in musical, dramatic or sporting activities. The Summer School continues to attract students who like to be busy and are keen to make the most of the opportunities on offer. As in previous years, there was great praise for both individual tutors and the course as a whole.

Our thanks:

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cambridge Classics Faculty, the Oxford Faculty Board of Classics, the Craven Committee (Oxford), the Jowett Copyright Trust, the Classical Association, Trinity College Cambridge, the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, the Gilbert Murray/Cromer Trust, and several private benefactors.

The Summer School is as always grateful to Bryanston School, whose staff do everything they can to be helpful, and of whose superb facilities we have free run. The Summer School also relies on the commitment and dedication of many individuals throughout the year. Julian Spencer has taken over as Treasurer, in succession to Andrew Downey who served in this role for 23 years. We owe a particularly large debt to Cathy Bothwell, the Course Secretary, who from autumn onwards arranges almost every aspect of the Summer School, from initial publicity through the applications process (now all online) and living arrangements at Bryanston to the coaches that transport people away at the end. Plans are in hand for celebration of the fiftieth Summer School in 2017.

John Taylor, Director
Henry Cullen, Director of Studies

The Students:

328 students attended this 48th JACT Greek Summer School. Three of these were in employment and a further 26 were undergraduate or postgraduate university students (including one from the Charles University in Prague, one from the Complutense University in Madrid, one from the Monteavila University in Caracas). The remaining 299 were at school or had just left. They included young people educated in Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Spain, and the USA, and 77 from maintained schools in the UK.

The Tutors:

There were 43 tutors, including 18 from universities (Oxford, Cambridge, Cologne, Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester, Manchester Metropolitan, Reading, Tel Aviv, and Warwick), four teaching at the Summer School for the first time, one of these four having been a Prospective Teacher at the Summer School in 2014. One tutorship was again generously supported by Trinity College, Cambridge. Two Potential Teachers were with us for the second week, shadowing and sharing teaching at all levels.

Greek Classes:

There were 88 Beginners in 12 groups, 54 Intermediates (i.e., pre-GCSE) in 8 groups, and 186 Advanced students (from immediately post-GCSE to university level) in 23 groups. No group had more than ten students, but the Beginners groups were kept to a maximum size of eight thanks to a special grant from the Cambridge Classics Faculty. The Beginners used Reading Greek, as did most of the Intermediates, though some of the latter used the Taylor course if that was what they had used previously. Favourite authors and texts read by Advanced groups included: of the many books of Homer that were read, Iliad 3, Iliad 6 andOdyssey 6; of prose authors, Plato, Lysias and Herodotus; of the dramatists, Euripides was the most popular, especially his Alcestisand Bacchae, but six groups this year read Aeschylus’ Persians, inspired by the production of that play at the end of the fortnight.

Beyond the classes:

Visiting lecturers were Tom Harrison on the reception of Herodotus, Peter Thonemann on echoes of Solon’s approach to debt in contemporary Greece, Alastair Harden on depictions of Persians in classical Greek art, and David Raeburn demonstrating the Sound of Greek in a sell-out afternoon seminar. The home team was represented by David Langslow on Patterns in Homer, Nick Denyer on the decoding of Protagoras’ myth, Angus Bowie on Aristophanes’ Birds, Philomen Probert on the history of the debate whether to pronounce Greek by accent or by quantity, and Anthony Bowen on Aeschylus’ Persians. The afternoon seminar programme again broke all previous records for the number and variety of topics on offer: scansion, Epicureanism, the myth of Hero and Leander, Greek history writing, accents, ecphrasis, inscriptions, Linear B, ancient medicine, prose composition, ancient reading and writing (practical), literary criticism, Greek literature and the Bible, Heraclitus on why peace would be a bad thing, and a read-through of the Persians in English.

Extra-curricular activities included as usual lively and entertaining competition between some forty teams in the Greek and general knowledge quiz, a walk the Iron Age site of Hod Hill, a lawn tennis tournament and an excursion to Salisbury. A moving and beautiful concert was held in the new auditorium, including performances by two choirs, a string band and an orchestra. Aristophanes’ Birds was a Summer-School first, in a hilarious production with a vastly talented cast and crew. The Greek play in the open-air theatre on the final evening was a grippingly watchable and beautifully spoken performance of Aeschylus’ Persians. Tutors and students worked together to produce literally spectacular costumes and props for both plays (including notably Persian trousers and head-dresses and about 20 bird-masks).

Students’ Feedback:

132 students (40%) returned questionnaires, with almost all their feedback extremely positive. 68% felt that they had made moreprogress with their Greek than they had expected, and almost all the rest that they had achieved at least as much as they had hoped. It was a typically industrious cohort: 91% of respondents said they had devoted at least three hours per day to independent study, 68% over four hours, and 33% five hours or more. The vast majority said that they had found the pace challenging but rewarding, the teaching clear and the environment supportive. Almost all respondents had attended many of the lectures and seminars on offer, and many had also found time to participate in the musical, dramatic or sporting activities. As in previous years, there were many unsolicited comments praising individual tutors and the course as a whole. We are once again very heartened by the students’ appreciation of the work of the Summer School.

Our Thanks:

The Summer School is, as always, grateful to Bryanston School, whose staff in all departments do everything they can to be helpful, and of whose world-class facilities we have virtually free run.

We gratefully acknowledge support from the Cambridge Classics Faculty, the Oxford Faculty Board of Classics, the Craven Committee (Oxford), the Jowett Copyright Trust, the Classical Association, Trinity College Cambridge, the Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, the JACT Greek Project, the Gilbert Murray/Cromer Trust and several private benefactors.